Human Resources, Recruiting and Retention – How Technology Fits in

Companies have been adopting technical assists in human resources for a while, but not all of us have access to the bigger picture that demonstrates technology’s benefits inside and outside company walls – including its surprising advantages for employees and job candidates. 

Automated phone interviews are one example of how automation helps human resources. While they are a tool designed to screen candidates and boost efficiency, they hold benefits for jobseekers as well. One advantage for job candidates is that they can schedule these interviews, giving them more preparation time. And, since their use can indicate additional pressure on an employer to fill a position quickly, smart job candidates can tease that information out in future conversations to gain a competitive edge. But automated phone interviews are just the tip of the technology/HR iceberg.

Automation boosts employee retention by sourcing employees who are ripe for promotions and other opportunities. Developing staff already onboard results in rewarded and motivated employees and reduced costs. When hiring from the outside, automation zips through online sources such as LinkedIn and Indeed to analyze resumes, compare them against job specifics and email invitations to applicants. Taking humans out of that part of the process makes it faster and arguably leads to better hires. There is little argument, however, that – all things being equal – speeding up processes results in higher company profits.  

Lynette Long, director of talent management and learning at Emergent Holdings, which includes AF Group, Advantasure and Senior Health Services, said, “At Emergent Holdings, we use VidCruiter. VidCruiter significantly decreases the time it takes to interview prospective job candidates, can be customized and helps with scheduling multiple interviews over multiple time zones. Also, it reduces costs, builds a better and standardized screening of candidates, is more efficient, reduces time-to-hire, and improves collaboration on the recruitment process.”

Long’s assessment noted that technology “improves collaboration.” Human resources experts find that automation does not replace people as much as it frees them to do better work. 

“Today’s businesses are working on a global platform and need world-class talent to reflect this. Job seekers want to work at a place where they can express themselves and have a healthy work-lifestyle balance, and employers recognize the need for a strong winning culture, which includes attracting the innovators and freethinkers from around the globe,” explained Tedi R. Parsons, managing partner with 2B Inclusive LLC, a Lansing-based professional development organization. “Leadership in human resources, often an employee’s first experience with an organization, is one of the ways this attraction is sparked.”

Tina Riley, associate professor and associate director of Michigan State University’s School of Human Resources and Labor Relations, shared insights in sync with Parsons. Riley also is a national presenter on human resources and leadership.

“Organizations that win the race for talent will be those that recognize the power of positive experiences, and those experiences begin with recruiting,” she said. “To attract talent and keep prospective candidates engaged, provide personalized attention through automation. By leveraging technology, busy recruiters can make every candidate feel valued. Remember, in an age of Instagram, Facebook and LinkedIn, it’s the moments that matter. Connect with prospective candidates and invite them to respond. Reaching out through social media and encouraging candidates to reach back helps build an online presence as an employer of choice. Be sure to use inclusive and welcoming language to increase the number of applications.”

With the technology genie out of the HR bottle, it seems wise to embrace the benefits to employers, job candidates and employees alike, and let the onboarding begin.

 

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